Journal articles

Using keyword research

Author Title Issue Keywords Abstract Sequence
McVea, Charmaine Spontaneity or Emotion as the Catalyst for Change - Corrective experiences in psychodrama (PDF, 320.2 KB) Journal 28 December 2019 action insight, corrective experience, emotion, emotion-focused therapy (EFT), Greenberg, J L Moreno, Moreno, Psychodrama, psychotherapy integration, research, social atom repair, spontaneity, transformation Corrective experiences are a common factor in effective therapies, often having profound transformative effects. While Greenberg proposes that the activation and processing of emotions produces corrective experiences, Moreno emphasises spontaneity as the therapeutic agent or catalyst of change. Drawing on research, Charmaine McVea argues for the greater efficacy of spontaneity. She proposes that spontaneity not only constitutes an outcome of corrective experiences but also contributes to the emergence of those experiences, specifically through the development of action insight and corrective interpersonal experience during psychodrama enactments. 2 2019-12
Tierney, Brian Sacrifice and spontaneity: a doctoral journey inspired by psychodrama (PDF, 262.1 KB) Journal 27 December 2018 Max Clayton, research Sacrifice—the process of making sacred through meaningful surrender— is the core topic of my doctoral research in psychology and psychodrama is at the heart of my research methodology. It was during psychodrama foundation training at the Corban Estate in Auckland, New Zealand with Max Clayton in 2010, that creative sacrifice and its relationship with spontaneity began to take root in me as a Muse that would power seven years of doctoral research and practice. 9 2018-12
; McVea, Charmaine A Discussion on Science and Research in Psychodrama (PDF, 302.7 KB) Journal 23 December 2014 Psychodrama, research My motivation for writing the article was to demonstrate that research can be done with integrity and can produce encouraging results that illuminate our practice and give us a vehicle to communicate the benefits of our method to others. By integrity, I mean that we can investigate psychodrama without compromising its form or philosophy. Elliott's approach is practice-based and, I believe, a good fit with psychodrama. I have a vision of creating a series of efficacy studies based on the work of AANZPA practitioners, which would combine to form a substantial research project. From my experience to date, I am confident that this research would demonstrate that psychodrama interventions can have positive therapeutic impacts that are maintained over time. Hopefully, it would also lead us into new discoveries about the therapeutically helpful aspects of psychodrama. 7 2014-12