Journal articles

Using keyword Max Clayton

Author Title Issue Keywords Abstract Sequence
Tierney, Brian Sacrifice and spontaneity: a doctoral journey inspired by psychodrama (PDF, 262.1 KB) Journal 27 December 2018 Max Clayton, research Sacrifice—the process of making sacred through meaningful surrender— is the core topic of my doctoral research in psychology and psychodrama is at the heart of my research methodology. It was during psychodrama foundation training at the Corban Estate in Auckland, New Zealand with Max Clayton in 2010, that creative sacrifice and its relationship with spontaneity began to take root in me as a Muse that would power seven years of doctoral research and practice. 9 2018-12
Howie, Peter Digging for gold: the search for meaning (PDF, 229.4 KB) Journal 27 December 2018 Max Clayton, warm up, warm-up, warming up What are you focusing on in your research?’ Max asked with clear interest. ‘Defining the psychodramatic concept of warm-up, Max,’ I said. I could see that Max was becoming mildly congested as his eyes reddened and his nostrils flared, presumably from the strengths of his responses ranging from ‘I’ve already written about that extensively’, to ‘Haven’t you listened to anything I’ve ever said?’ Not waiting for the congestion or dyspepsia to pass, whichever it might have actually been, I hurried on to head him off at the pass. ‘I know you’ve written about warm-up extensively in your co-authored book and in other works and chapters. You’ve written about how to recognise it, how to work with it, and where to expect it. And you’ve also taught extensively on how to notice and recognise it, and then work with it psychodramatically.’ As I spoke, Max seemed to settle, so I continued... 4 2018-12
Farnsworth, John Boundary and Flow: Max Clayton and Psychodrama in Action (PDF, 155.7 KB) Journal 22 December 2013 boundary, containment, flow, Max Clayton, Psychodrama, psychotherapy, Winnicot What has containment to do with the vitality of the psychodramatic method? In this article, John Farnsworth recalls a vivid demonstration by Max Clayton in 2002 of how containment and flow relate to each other. Max also raised important questions about how closely psychodrama and psychotherapy relate through these concepts.The article investigates each of these concerns, illustrating them by investigating how boundary and flow appear in different settings, whether with individuals, groups, face-to-face or online. 13 2013-12
Mapel, Tim Through a Glass Darkly: Coming Face to Face With Mirroring in Psychodrama (PDF, 122.0 KB) Journal 21 December 2012 Max Clayton, stages of human development, mirror technique, mirroring, Moreno, Psychodrama, Zerka Moreno Mirroring is a central element in psychodrama but the term is used in variable ways in different contexts. In this article, Tim Mapel investigates these various meanings. He focuses first on the historical development of the mirror concept in the writings of J.L. and Zerka Moreno, both as a therapeutic technique and as a stage of human development. Later writings, particularly contributions by Dr. Max Clayton, are then considered followed by a discussion of the contemporary uses of mirroring in psychodramatic production. What emerges is greater clarity regarding the concept and technique of mirroring. 12 2012-12
Thomson, Vivienne Reflections on Role Theory (PDF, 309.6 KB) Journal 23 December 2014 Max Clayton, role theory, Zerka Moreno I am a child playing in the sand arranging and rearranging the sand to create forms that are my own form of art and meaning. I am constructing and deconstructing, involved with the texture of the sand, the tactile sense of the grains passing through my hands. I notice how the sand moves in response to my touch and the weight or wetness of the mounds. Sometimes the grains sparkle and I am reminded that sand is essentially glass and a central component in the manufacturing of steel. My father works with both glass and steel he is a sculptor and engineer. It is not lost on me how significant he is as an ever present influence on me; and my mother, too, who is a source of inspiration for my creative endeavours. All the world is in a grain of sand. The simple act of playing in the sand gives me pleasure. Others watching are also enjoying the naive play. It is even more fun when I am with playmates engaging in the sand play when the results of our collective endeavour expand, our ideas transform as we connect with each other and our constructions meet up. Our delight is mutual. 4 2014-12