Journal articles

Using keyword J.L. Moreno

Author Title Issue Keywords Abstract Sequence
Tapley, Kate The Horse as an Auxiliary for Life - Natural horsemanship, psychodrama and leadership development (PDF, 178.2 KB) Journal 28 December 2019 auxiliary, healing, horse, human development, J.L. Moreno, leadership, Moreno, natural horsemanship, Psychodrama Natural horsewoman and psychodrama trainee Kate Tapley draws our attention to the horse as an auxiliary for life. Through her work training riders in natural horsemanship from a psychodramatic perspective, she has noticed that horses, unerring sentients that they are, act as auxiliaries for human beings, mirroring their inner often unconscious experience with immediacy and authenticity, and following only those riders who prove themselves willing to enter their here and now world of being-ness and presence, as ‘true leaders’. This article presents the application of this approach during a natural horsemanship workshop and the positive outcomes in terms of leadership development, healing and wholeness. 7 2019-12
O'Rourke, Patricia The Thinking Heart, The Loving Mind - The application of psychodrama in therapeutic reunification work with maltreated and neglected infants and their parents (PDF, 181.0 KB) Journal 28 December 2019 babies, child protection, infant, J.L. Moreno, Moreno, parents, Psychodrama, therapeutic reunification In this article, Patricia O’Rourke describes the way in which she applies psychodrama in her therapeutic reunification work with parents and babies in the child protection system in Australia. The paper was developed from a keynote address delivered to the Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association (AANZPA) Conference in Brisbane in January 2019. 6 2019-12
Clark, Cushla Staging the Therapeutic Experience - Using Moreno’s psychodrama stage in parenting groups for women (PDF, 259.9 KB) Journal 28 December 2019 action space, audience, balcony, enactment, J.L. Moreno, levels, Moreno, Psychodrama, psychodrama stage, spontaneity, warm up, warm up step Moreno proposed the psychodrama stage as the first instrument of psychodrama. He designed it with four levels, the audience, the warm up step, the action space and the balcony, which mirror the stages of a protagonist’s warming up process. Providing illustrations focused on the use of the warm up level or step and the balcony in parenting groups for women, Cushla Clark proposes that a psychodramatist who maintains consciousness of the structure of the Morenian stage, including improvising the different levels when physical constraints are present, is able to enhance a protagonist’s warm up to spontaneity and produce a full and satisfying dramatic enactment. This article is drawn from Cushla’s AANZPA thesis, Liberation via The Stage. 5 2019-12
Logeman, Walter Encounter - The heart of psychodramatic couple therapy (PDF, 183.1 KB) Journal 28 December 2019 begegnung, couple therapy, doubling, encounter, J.L. Moreno, love, mirroring, Moreno, natural groups, Psychodrama, relationship, role reversal, spontaneity, synthetic groups, tele This article is concerned with the application of psychodrama principles and practices to couple therapy. In particular, it explores Moreno’s philosophy of encounter, that meeting of two, ‘face to face and eye to eye’, which lies at the heart of psychodramatic couple therapy. Drawing on illustrative material, the author shows the way in which the psychodrama structure of warm up, action and sharing apply in a couple therapy session, with the encounter presenting as the action phase. He also describes the psychodramatic techniques of doubling, mirroring and role reversal as they are used to facilitate the encounter. 3 2019-12
McVea, Charmaine Spontaneity or Emotion as the Catalyst for Change - Corrective experiences in psychodrama (PDF, 320.2 KB) Journal 28 December 2019 action insight, corrective experience, emotion, emotion-focused therapy (EFT), Greenberg, J.L. Moreno, Moreno, Psychodrama, psychotherapy integration, research, social atom repair, spontaneity, transformation Corrective experiences are a common factor in effective therapies, often having profound transformative effects. While Greenberg proposes that the activation and processing of emotions produces corrective experiences, Moreno emphasises spontaneity as the therapeutic agent or catalyst of change. Drawing on research, Charmaine McVea argues for the greater efficacy of spontaneity. She proposes that spontaneity not only constitutes an outcome of corrective experiences but also contributes to the emergence of those experiences, specifically through the development of action insight and corrective interpersonal experience during psychodrama enactments. 2 2019-12